The Inertia

The Inertia

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Surf

ICON: Mike Coots on Loving the Tiger Shark that Took His Leg

"To help sharks... it was worth losing a limb just for that alone. And to help other amputees and kids that are dealing with limb loss, I feel really blessed. If you want to do something, don't worry about what people tell you. If you think you can do it, just do it." - Mike Coots Most would be grateful to simply survive. Many would graciously move forward appreciating the small moments that make the day-to-day. Mike Coots? He wanted more. And not only for himself, but for sharks, including the tiger shark that took his leg. When he lost his limb, he knew life wouldn't be the same. And he knew he was lucky to be alive — despite any potential struggles with Stockholm syndrome and life adjusted. Yet he also knew he was beyond fortunate to live in a place where prosthetics and acceptance were readily available. In many regions around the world, those who suffer from limb loss aren't treated so kindly. So while Mike would go on to be grateful to have survived, and would appreciate the small moments that make the day-to-day, he would additionally strive to make a difference, standing both tall and proud for those who weren't so fortunate – from amputees to sharks. Mike Coots is a surfer. Mike Coots is a survivor. Mike Coots is an advocate. Mike Coots is an ICON.

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Surf

This Might Be the Prettiest Footage of Surfing Giant Maverick's We've Ever Seen - The Inertia

Maverick's, in Half Moon Bay, California, is one of the surfing's most menacing and dangerous big waves. This edit shows exactly why. Shot and Edited by Adam Warmington 

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Surf

Surf Photographer Clark Little on Staring Down Shorebreak to Get the Perfect Shot - The Inertia

Getting tossed around by shorebreak and slammed into the sand day after day is a rough go; Clark Little wouldn't have it any other way. In fact, for the North Shore local, it's all in a good day's work. But the Waimea addict didn't grow up snapping shots with his father's camera like so many photographers do. He instead set out to capture his longtime stomping grounds when his wife came home with a framed photograph of Waimea shorebreak, an image he figured he would be able to easily replicate. Having never owned a camera, he threw a cheap "waterproof" casing over a cheaper point-and-shoot and headed out to the beach. Since that first attempt, Clark has not only emulated his wife's purchased wall art, but — with a gallery in Haleiwa and international recognition — has become a heavily respected fixture of wave photography.

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